Europe

Europe's Debt Crisis and Keynes' Green Cheese Solution

  • By
  • Thomas Palley,
  • New America Foundation
May 23, 2010 |

The great German physicist Max Planck remarked that “science advances one funeral at a time.” The situation is worse in economics, which is subject to regress, as happened when the valuable but imperfect insights of Keynesianism were supplanted by the ideological blinkers of neo-liberalism.

Could the U.S. End Up Like Greece?

  • By
  • Anne Vorce,
  • New America Foundation
May 20, 2010 |

Over the past month, we've watched from distant shores as Greece has plunged into a debt crisis. Mounting pressure from global financial markets forced Greece to begin a drastic austerity program.

With a fiscal deficit of 8.1 percent of GDP and government debt of 115 percent of GDP expected this year, Greece has promised to turn itself around by 2013.

Greek Crisis Leads to Positive Steps

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
May 14, 2010 |

Contrary to what the doomsayers have been saying, Greece's debt crisis may turn out to be one of the best things to happen to the European Union.

While the situation has been messy, it also has signaled a badly needed wake-up call to Europe about a flaw at the heart of its monetary union. That in turn has resulted in a move toward reforms that have the potential to lead to sensible financial regulation and transparency, as well as to strengthen Europe's union. These reforms include:

What the Doomsayers Haven’t Been Telling You About Greece

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
April 15, 2010 |

The recent battle over healthcare reform in the United States, in which the Obama administration was barely able to pass weak reform, is just further proof of how far the US has fallen behind Europe. Yet all the media has been able to obsess over for the last couple of months is – the Greek debt crisis!

Europe's Answer to Wall Street

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
April 21, 2010 |

A year and a half after an economic earthquake shook the world, the so-called experts are still trying to figure out what happened and how to move forward. In the shadows of that confusion, new economic models are beginning to find traction.

The Promise and Perils of Direct Democracy

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 12:00pm

In 1911, the state of California adopted a system of direct democracy that its authors based on the Swiss system. A century later, Swiss initiative and referendum is considered a crucial part of that country's formula for efficient, consensus-based government. In California, however, initiative and referendum are considered leading culprits in turning the Golden State into a chaotic, ungovernable mess.

What happened?

A Mosque in Munich

Tuesday, May 18, 2010 - 3:30pm

On May 18th Ian Johnson, author of A Mosque in Munich and the Chief of the Wall Street Journal’s Berlin Bureau joined Schwartz Fellow Nicholas Schmidle to discuss the history of the Muslim Brotherhood in the West through the lens of the chequered history of the Islamic Center of Munich.

Reflecting on a Transatlantic Relationship That We Want to Have Rather Than What “Is”

Tuesday, April 27, 2010 - 12:00pm

**This event has reached capacity and registration is closed**
 

The Friedrich Naumann Foundation and the New America Foundation invite you to to a speech and luncheon featuring Dr. Wolfgang Gerhardt, member of the German Bundestag.

Europe Tax Model Delivers Much More

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
April 15, 2010 |

Most Americans seem to regard April 15 – the day income tax returns are due to the Internal Revenue Service – as a recurring tragedy akin to a biblical plague. Particularly this year, with U.S. government deficits soaring, everyone from the tea baggers to Fox News and Senate Republicans are sounding the alarm about a return to "big government."

Ex-New York mayor Rudy Giuliani even stated recently that President Barack Obama was moving us toward – gasp – European socialism.

Politics And Faith

  • By
  • Peter Beinart,
  • New America Foundation
April 9, 2010 |

Reading Ian Buruma makes you feel parochial. In “Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents,” he writes intimately about the relationship between politics and faith in Britain, the Netherlands, France, China, Japan and the United States. And beneath every cliché — about American religious fervor, French intolerance or Japanese godlessness — he uncovers ironies that wreak havoc with popular stereotypes.

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