Finance

The U.S. Economy After The Great Recession

  • By
  • Sherle R. Schwenninger,
  • Samuel Sherraden,
  • New America Foundation
March 4, 2014
The bursting of the housing bubble in 2008 plunged the U.S. economy into a serious crisis, leaving American households with a huge debt overhang and the economy with a large gap in output and employment. This report reviews the economy’s deleveraging and recovery experience more than five years after the crash. It explores the following questions:  
  • How far has the economy come in the deleveraging process? Is private sector debt now at a sustainable level or do households and the financial sector continue to need to pay down debt?  
  • To what extent has the U.S.

Forget The Wealth Effect: It’s Time to Focus on The Income Effect to Understand the Sluggish Economy

October 1, 2013

by Peter W. Atwater

The “wealth effect” concept is remarkably simple: spending increases (decreases) as perceived wealth increases (decreases). When people perceive themselves to be richer, they spend more.

With the prices of stocks and bonds near all-time highs and home prices on the rebound, consumer spending should be on a tear. But it’s not -- much to the consternation of many economists, particularly those at the Federal Reserve. As a result, many believe the wealth effect is somehow broken.

Children are Potential Future Investors who can and do Accumulate Savings

February 27, 2013
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This is America Saves Week, which is an annual campaign that encourages nationwide discussion on savings and promotes good savings behavior. For those of us in the asset-building field, this is an opportunity to elevate research on the relationship between savings and life outcomes. This research can help justify the importance of good savings behavior, especially when these habits and behaviors start early in life. So in honor of America Saves Week, here are some of the research highlights from the asset-building field. Specifically, these highlights come from our research at the Assets and Education Initiative (AEDI) at the University of Kansas School of Welfare, where we are studying the relationship between children's savings and their financial and educational outcomes later in life.

High-Speed Trades Hurt Investors, a Study Says

  • By
  • Christopher Leonard,
  • New America Foundation
  • and Nathaniel Popper
December 3, 2012 |

A top government economist has concluded that the high-speed trading firms that have come to dominate the nation’s financial markets are taking significant profits from traditional investors.

The chief economist at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Andrei Kirilenko, reports in a coming study that high-frequency traders make an average profit of as much as $5.05 each time they go up against small traders buying and selling one of the most widely used financial contracts.

From Growth Compression to Reflation: The Road Ahead

November 28, 2012

by Jay Pelosky

This article originally appeared in The Huffington Post. View the original piece here.

Debt, Deficits, and Demographics

  • By Dean Baker, Center for Economic and Policy Research
November 19, 2012

For much of the last three decades, policy debates in the United States have been dominated by a quixotic concern about deficits, debt, and demographics. This concern has distracted policy from fundamental economic issues that have much more direct bearing on economic well-being, most notably the growth (and bursting) of the housing bubble in the last decade. While large deficits can have a negative impact on economic growth, this impact has been hugely misrepresented in public debates.

Central Banks Have Made Their Moves -- What's Next?

September 27, 2012

by Jay Pelosky

This piece originally appeared in the Huffington Post.

 

FDIC 2011 Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households Highlight Opportunities for Bank Savings Accounts

September 13, 2012
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Yesterday, the FDIC released a new report detailing the results of the 2011 Survey of Unbanked and Underbanked Households (“Households” Survey). The first survey was done back in 2009. The FDIC is required by legislative mandate to survey banks’ efforts to serve the unbanked and will continue doing the Households survey every two years. Key findings from the report, as summarized by the FDIC, are:

  • 8.2 percent of U.S.

Event Summary: Building Better Savings Products

August 2, 2012
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On Tuesday, July 31, the Asset Building Program hosted an event which investigated innovative savings programs for low-income Americans. “Building Better Savings Products,” moderated by Senior Policy Analyst Pamela Chan, brought together a group of panelists who have all been trying to tackle the issue of access to financial services in various ways.

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