Media

PIPAC Opposition to National Association of Broadcasters' Petition for Stay Pending Judicial Review

  • By Media Policy Initiative
July 10, 2012

The Public Interest Public Airwaves Coalition (“PIPAC”) strongly opposes the National Association of Broadcasters (“NAB”) petition for stay pending judicial review of the Federal Communications Commission rule requiring that broadcast television stations post the contents of their public inspection files on a website to be maintained by the Commission. NAB has failed to meet any of the criteria necessary for a stay.

Open Data Movement

  • By
  • Alissa Black,
  • New America Foundation
July 2, 2012 |

The open data movement is taking root at the local level. Since President Barack Obama’s 2009 memorandum on transparency and open government, datacatalogs.org has reported that more than 40 state, county, and local governments in the United States have put data catalogues online. Open data policies typically define open data as structured standardized data in machine readable formats published for the public. This means that government data can be downloaded in such formats as CSV, KML, XML, and even XLS. Sharing information is not new.

Building a Multi-Platform Media For—and By—the Public

  • By
  • Tom Glaisyer,
  • Benjamin Lennett,
  • New America Foundation

At first glance, the new rule approved last month by the Federal Communications Commission requiring local television broadcasters to make public their records on political ad spending might seem revelatory. But in reality, it represents a very modest change to longstanding policy.

Government and the Net Serve Us, Not Vice Versa

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
May 16, 2012 |

A global struggle for control of the internet is under way. At stake is nothing less than civil liberties, privacy and democracy itself. Electronic censorship and surveillance are on the rise -- not only in dictatorships but also in democracies. Facebook and Google are battling over who will be our gateway to the rest of the internet through "like" buttons and universal logins -- giving them huge power over our online identities and activities. Companies are clashing with governments over how far the law should extend into private networks, platforms and devices.

Murdoch's Shakespearean Tragedy

  • By
  • Steve Coll,
  • New America Foundation
May 10, 2012 |

Last Thursday, in Surrey, England, shortly after sunrise, British police arrested a fifty-seven-year-old retired Scotland Yard detective. He was the twenty-seventh person arrested in a bribery investigation known as Operation Elveden, which is the most opaque but arguably the most important of the multiple investigations of journalism and crime at News Corporation, the media giant controlled by Rupert Murdoch. News Corp. has its headquarters in the United States and is the parent company of Fox News, among other properties.

Programs:

How the Obama Administration’s Narrative About Chen Guangcheng Unraveled, One Tweet at a Time

  • By
  • Emily Parker,
  • New America Foundation
May 4, 2012 |

When Chen Guangcheng departed the U.S. Embassy in Beijing on Wednesday with apparent guarantees that he would lead a safe and productive life in his native land, it seemed that a major international crisis had been averted. In a startlingly short period of time, American and Chinese officials had hammered out an agreement that seemed to protect Chen, while preserving the bilateral relationship.

The Shawshank Prevention

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
May 2, 2012 |

The "Shawshank Redemption" has nothing to do with China, but that hasn't kept social media censors from blocking the movie's title from searches on the country's most popular Twitter-like microblogging service, Weibo.

The Not-So-Great Firewall of China

  • By
  • Rebecca MacKinnon,
  • New America Foundation
April 17, 2012 |

Every news organization needs a social media strategy. Even China's government-controlled Xinhua News Agency now "tweets" news bulletins through Twitter-like microblogs called weibo -- through which more than 300 million users share details of their daily lives, jokes, gossip, and news.

Finding journalism's Future

  • By
  • Victor Pickard,
  • New America Foundation
April 11, 2012 |

This newspaper's parent company sold last week for $55 million, a staggering $460 million less than what it fetched in 2006. The plight of the company, which also owns the Daily News and Philly.com, reflects trends afflicting newspapers across the country, which continue to bleed revenue and jobs as readers and advertisers migrate to the Internet. It seems that advertising-fueled newspapers, nearly the last institutional bastion of journalism, are not sustainable.

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